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Month 7, Day 9, 5 ABY, 5:28 PM

Cthulhuvong's Treatise on Nation Simulations


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#1
Cthulhuvong

Cthulhuvong

    The Tentacle-Faced Mad Man

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So I've posted this before, and figured I'd post here too in case someone wants to make their own and needs to know how to do it properly.

 

Index:


Einstein would turn over in his grave. Not only does God play dice, the dice are loaded.
~Chairman Sheng-ji Yang, The Human Hive, Alpha Centauri
----------------------------------------------------------------------
It is not the function of our government to keep the citizen from falling into error; it is the function of the citizen to keep the government from falling into error
~US Supreme Court Justice Robert H. Jackson, 1950
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Always remember that the crowd that applauds your coronation is the same crowd that will applaud your beheading. People like a show.
~Going Postal, Sir Terry Pratchett
----------------------------------------------------------------------
America is the only nation in history which miraculously has gone directly from barbarism to degeneration without the usual interval of civilization.
~Georges Clemenceau

#2
Cthulhuvong

Cthulhuvong

    The Tentacle-Faced Mad Man

  • Members
  • 397 posts
Introduction
As many of you know, I have made more than my share of nation sims in the past. I'm up there beyond even Falsegods and Shadows in ideas put forward, as well as those started worked on and those that have tried to lift off. I was about to go to sleep, when I thought of Wiry's latest attempt for a game, and then Conductor asking me to make a Game of Thrones sim, and I thought "people need to know the work this takes". So here I am, 1:41am, writing about making games for free.
 
 
Chapter 1: A discussion on the difference between "An Idea" and "A Viable Game"
 
Many come to me, or start their own game, with "An Idea". This could be the simple "Modern-era Nation Sim" or something more complex like "Steampunk-to-Dieselpunk Alternate History where the Central Powers win the Great War, in a nation sim". In any event, these are just "An Idea", and nowhere near "A Viable Game". Now you might rush to me and say 'But I have 20 pages of background material and a map!' and I will respond 'That is all you have then'. The reason I would be so mean is because, while you might have written a vibrant history, with piles of information about the setting, you have yet to think of it as a game. In your head, its still a new world to be discovered.
 
This brings us to Problem 1: This is a game, not a world generation experiment. I know, making worlds can be fun, I know, I do it more often than I should. But anyone can start a wiki and make their own little interconnected world, even inviting others to join in. But that is not what you are doing. You are making a game, and you must remember this first and foremost. It took me time to come upon this realization (about the time I got 10 offers for games on my site, allowed 5 to go up as forums, and watched only 1 get to the design phase). And making a game is work, rewarding work when it pays off, but still work.
 
So what makes "A Viable Game"? First, you must put the idea to the side. Don't throw it out, you'll need it, but it is not the paramount of your work just yet. Second, determine the scope of the game and what kind of mapping you'll use [Those familiar with game and world design will know this as the "top-down approach"]. The whole galaxy is kinda sparse when you have 10 players each having their own, single, planet spread out around it. Being spread out is detrimental to diplomacy, trade, and play in the end. But don't make it too crowded unless you want wars (and lots of them), with everyone in one valley with minimal ways out, people will clash, and quickly. So find a happy middle, maybe even shooting for smaller than middle with room to expand (in case the idea doesn't pick up as many as you thought it would). 
 
The Third step comes to Problem 2: What is Society like? Now I don't need you to tell me who's the biggest retailer or who's the most famous person, let me explain. Society, in my mind is broken down into Economic, Government, and Social factors, so answer the important stuff about each in turn. Economically, whats the universal (or simply trade) currency, and how does it affect other currencies, if any? Also, how is a nation's total income calculated as well as available industrial capacity, and is that capacity military only or include other things (such as building cities or more capacity)? In Government, what is the overarching government like (or if none, what is the most common government type)? Additionally, how are militaries seen overall in the 'game world'? This will determine if buildups are good or bad, if people are peaceniks or warmongerers, and so on. In Social, this is more about how society functions, what is each society's view of other societies like? How do they interact? Are some Isolationist? Additionally, what are people like on the average? You don't have to go down to the man on the street for every city, but every major civilization should be touched on.
 
The Fourth step is what I call "The Crunch". Stats my friend, and they are your friend or enemy, depending on how big a hole you dig. If, in the above Third step you wrote another 20 pages, you're going to have to turn that into hard statistics to create a game. At this step, you start to see "A Viable Game" and the task ahead. This and the next step is where most people drop out. You must remain strong if "An Idea" is to become "A Viable Game". The Easiest way to start this step is to choose something simple to latch onto and build from there. Population or money are the usual suspects, but some build from other things. In any case, you must make sure this is solid, before you build on it. Don't say 'we're using gold bars' and then change it to gold coins later, you'll have to redo all your work and might as well start over. And if you don't think its that bad to change one word in your work, imagine if you calculated for how many gold bars it would cost to make a house, and now you've changed to coins. Now redo every calculation for everything in the game. 
 
Once you're done with the Fourth step, you must recheck everything you did in it and make sure you did not just make a nation sheet and some numbers. If you did this start over. What you need is a list of stats that affect each other. Only then can you move onto the Fifth step, which is calculations. You must take what you have built and bring it together into one flowing spreadsheet (or word doc if you wish). Put everything there: every number, every equation. Make sure they all fit together. Start testing them with random numbers (within parameters, you're not going to pay 150% of upkeep on your military unless you are crazy, nor will paying -50% make any sense), to check if things come out as you desire. Now you will likely come onto Problem 3: Errant stats. What I mean is stats that don't seem to do anything, just sit there and take up space. If you have a number that doesn't have anything to do with anything else, why is it there? Did you forget to add its effect or is it just a description (these are fine, but should be left out of any calculations, check Step Six)? If the number doesn't seem to be affected by anything else, or affect anything else, it is most likely useless. If you want, keep it but beware.
 
The Sixth step is when you pick up that idea you set aside. Look at it, then look at your calculations. Put in what you think each nation (or planet, or whatever) should have for stats, then see what it looks like after a few years. Does that look right? If so, good. If not, you may want to either revise your numbers or your background. One is going to give in the end. Try to find the limits in this system you have created. If something seems more powerful than it should be, cut it down some. If something is less than it should be, raise it up. This is your balancing phase, where you not only balance your idea with the system, but your system with your idea and itself. Here you can add in your descriptive 'stats' and make up a nation page. From there, any other things that need to be made should be and tested (and by this I don't mean "make your military units in step Six, this should have been done in Four). Finally, to finish out this step, plan how you want the forum to be set up (trust me, a good setup is important, and saves you the hassle of people saying "Wheres the OOC board? I wanna post pics of my cat!"). 
 
From there comes the Seventh step: Actually setting up a forum. Once this is up, make sure it feels good (there are dozens of free forum software and websites), and then make it look good, and then set up the rules. You need rules, such as "No multi accounts" and "be nice", or people will abuse the system. Also include how to play the game (how to submit budgets, order units, make deals, etc), or people will not even give the game a second look. 
 
If you've followed these, the Eighth step is the most satisfying. Put your board online and get people to check it out. If this works, you should have a running game in no time. But remember, your first round should always be a Test Round. SWD didn't do this and we found out that the clock wouldn't work properly, so our 2nd round was a continuation of the 1st rather than a truly separate round. After your test round (don't do more than 5 years, unless you want your game to go long with short rounds), go back over your calculations and background, and get feedback from players and any admins you have. Work on any problems, and then you should be good for a Round 1! Of course, there's always room for improvement, so nothing should be set in stone. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
It is now 2:41am. I wrote that in 1 hour. I will continue tomorrow night with a new chapter.

Einstein would turn over in his grave. Not only does God play dice, the dice are loaded.
~Chairman Sheng-ji Yang, The Human Hive, Alpha Centauri
----------------------------------------------------------------------
It is not the function of our government to keep the citizen from falling into error; it is the function of the citizen to keep the government from falling into error
~US Supreme Court Justice Robert H. Jackson, 1950
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Always remember that the crowd that applauds your coronation is the same crowd that will applaud your beheading. People like a show.
~Going Postal, Sir Terry Pratchett
----------------------------------------------------------------------
America is the only nation in history which miraculously has gone directly from barbarism to degeneration without the usual interval of civilization.
~Georges Clemenceau

#3
Cthulhuvong

Cthulhuvong

    The Tentacle-Faced Mad Man

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Corollary to Chapter 1: Control on the Setting

 

Question by IcedSquirrel:

On the judging player base part, how do you balance the need to keep world reactions to player actions grounded in the narrative environment while also allowing players enough freedom to, for the most part, play as they like?

 

This is a big struggle you will always have. First you must decide what the major parts of the background are, things that are set in stone tablets. These are things like hyperdrive and the Force in Star Wars, or social norms in some other games. Now the thing most people misunderstand about this is that you don't have to mention everything on the stone tablets, just what you want the players to know and what they need to know. Let's say Earth is lost, and must be found, you should know where it is, to keep people informed if they find it, but they shouldn't know where it is off the bat, or even that it's findable.
 
Second you need to decide how much you steer the players. This can be anywhere from "railroading" them to "giving them the wheel". Railroading should rarely if ever be used in gaming, as much if not all of the freedom is gone. You control the story in such a world, and they affect little. Giving the wheel over is more acceptable, but should be used with caution and many rules on stone tablets, both known and unknown. This is basically to save you from 'patching' the game later when a player turns the course off onto the unbeaten path.
 
My favorite, however, is the "hand on the till" route. In this you keep control of it just a bit, keeping players moving and away from things that might get them stuck or bored, but letting them control the motion of the game. In this you're more of a guide. Now to the how. This is where we get problems, as differing play styles may not meld. Your best bet is to first, assume some who join are going to quit. It happens. Next, you need to figure out what each play style wants. 
 
I use the Bartle Gamer Scale: Killers, Achievers, Explorers, Socializers. Killers want competition, they want to fight other players (and not always in combat). Achievers want to 'beat' the game or score up in some way. Explorers want to find out things, discovery of both the world and its system are paramount. Socializers want to interact and weave a story. K in sims need some way to play against others, such as military and economic stuff. A will not usually be able to 'win' but they may get awards after the round or be seen as the best (these are the hardest to make happy sometimes). E are usually happy if they can try new things, but can be easily bored. S are usually the easiest to keep happy, as they just want a story.
 
Now no one is just one of these, everyone is a mix, but some favor one over the others. You must either try to cater to all, or say that some players won't like the game (which few like to say).

Einstein would turn over in his grave. Not only does God play dice, the dice are loaded.
~Chairman Sheng-ji Yang, The Human Hive, Alpha Centauri
----------------------------------------------------------------------
It is not the function of our government to keep the citizen from falling into error; it is the function of the citizen to keep the government from falling into error
~US Supreme Court Justice Robert H. Jackson, 1950
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Always remember that the crowd that applauds your coronation is the same crowd that will applaud your beheading. People like a show.
~Going Postal, Sir Terry Pratchett
----------------------------------------------------------------------
America is the only nation in history which miraculously has gone directly from barbarism to degeneration without the usual interval of civilization.
~Georges Clemenceau

#4
Cthulhuvong

Cthulhuvong

    The Tentacle-Faced Mad Man

  • Members
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Chapter 2: Judging your player base
 
So you've worked through and made "A Viable Game" and want to show it to the world. Good. But now you must choose who to show it to. First, show it to someone whose opinion you trust. Let them find the flaws. If there are any, reconcile them with you idea and make sure it runs smooth (but don't change things you don't want to just to satisfy others). Once you're ready, its time to show it to the world. I prefer the blitz campaign, hitting multiple sites with the same message at the same time, but people differ, so go as you will. But you need to now sell the game to your would be players. If you get just one negative comment, that's good, but expect more. 'Why didn't you do X?' or 'Why not try a Y type of game?' are common complaints. Hell, every time I put forward a game idea lately I always get someone who wants me to make a Game of Thrones nation sim (mainly because they don't want to do the work in Chapter 1). Just stick to your guns and tell people about it. Answer politely, and just try to get people interested.
 
The easiest way to get people interest, at least that I've found, is to get them hooked on the game world. Make them feel the world, make them see your vision. This works for most potential players, as they are visionaries too. Some however, need a different approach, and you'll notice these are the ones who ask about game mechanics ('how does tax affect popularity?' for example). These people you want to impress. Show them how your engine works (at the basic levels, don't give up the deep stuff such as equations and such). You'll want a good mix of both types of players, especially on the Test Round, because one will find the holes in your world, the other will find the holes in your engine. Oh you thought we were done testing your genius? Nope, it will always be tested, even when the game is running normal rounds. 
 
Now the most important step in judging your player base is figuring out who you think can help run the game. For most small games, you really only need 1 person. However, if you wish to be a player-admin, you must, and I stress MUST, have at least a second person on the admin staff, either as a full admin or player-admin. The reason is not because I think you'll take advantage, whether you mean to or not, but that your players eventually will, regardless of if you do. You know the world the best, and will generally know the engine the best as well, and thus have the best starting chance of anyone. If you want to play and run it, you need assistance to make sure there is no appearance of bias. Another way to gauge if you need more people on staff is if you are generally busy in real life, then definitely get some help, even if you're a full admin and they're just a player-admin. Finally, you need help if you have more than 10 players. Even just 11 players means you've got at minimum 11 things to look at each day usually, whether its arms deals or treaties or actions. Each is going to take on average 10 minutes to do, which means with 11 players you're spending 2 hours on a game. Burnout is right around the corner for you if you keep that up. Even if you're someone like Falsegods, who is a processing machine, burnout will occur eventually. Get help with your game.
 
Now once you've got players, you need to make sure they understand the rules (both board "don't mess with Texas" rules and game rules) so that the game will run smoothly. Then you can start applications, at which point the game really begins. At this point, its hard to tell where you'll need help, as problems can come in from anywhere. Always take help if you can, usually no more than 1 admin per 5 players is needed, however. But don't take help from those you don't trust to do the job, and be ready to demote when necessary. Be firm but fair, and players will reward you with a good game. Other than that, if you've gotten this far, you've done better than half the games I've made.
 
Now every so often a problem player will pop up, someone who takes advantage of rules and tries to push around everyone. You're in charge, remember that, and don't let it happen. If one player gets an unfair advantage (and remember, you're the arbiter of fairness), take them down a peg. Don't obliterate an empire a player has carefully worked on, but if someone is a warmongerer, make everyone around them arm up. If someone buys up the competition, make prices go up. Use their own tactics against them, make them think. If you don't, you will find yourself with everyone vs 1 player, and one side is going to lose eventually. Now if it seems to be in all good fun, let it roll, but otherwise make it less confrontational. If the 1 player leaves, then you're stuck dealing with their empire. If all the others leave, you have no player base. But remember that this is not for those that have worked hard, just those that try to rush the system. I've seen guys unite the Balkans in a few years time through great diplomacy, with both core territory and periphery allies all throughout Europe. I've also seen people in the same game take huge swaths of territory through blitzkrieg because the admins let them. I guess what I'm trying to get across to you is that you are in control of the world, and once you relinquish that control, you are setting yourself up for failure. It won't always happen (the veterans in this community are pretty good at self regulating each other), but it can happen, and you need to be the angry fist of god coming down to crush the enemies of the game.

Einstein would turn over in his grave. Not only does God play dice, the dice are loaded.
~Chairman Sheng-ji Yang, The Human Hive, Alpha Centauri
----------------------------------------------------------------------
It is not the function of our government to keep the citizen from falling into error; it is the function of the citizen to keep the government from falling into error
~US Supreme Court Justice Robert H. Jackson, 1950
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Always remember that the crowd that applauds your coronation is the same crowd that will applaud your beheading. People like a show.
~Going Postal, Sir Terry Pratchett
----------------------------------------------------------------------
America is the only nation in history which miraculously has gone directly from barbarism to degeneration without the usual interval of civilization.
~Georges Clemenceau

#5
Cthulhuvong

Cthulhuvong

    The Tentacle-Faced Mad Man

  • Members
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Chapter 3: This game is not yours alone, share it
 
So you've got a vision for your game. Good. 
 
Then you start your game and its a success. Great!
 
Now the players are going somewhere you hadn't thought of with it. Grand! 
 
 
 
Now if that third part upset you or otherwise made you feel negative emotions, you need to stop for a minute. When you started, this was your baby. Heck, until you invited someone to look at it, it was still yours. But once you show that idea to someone else, and they have any input, it is no longer completely yours. It becomes a group work of sorts. You may be in control, but you are no longer all seeing and all knowing. This becomes more so when the players start to interact with it. You still hold the lion's share of control, but you must now decide how to use it.
 
You now have 3 options: railroad the players in a "my way or the highway" fashion, give up control of the story to the players, or take the middle road and "guide" them. I like the middle road, leaning towards player control. The reasons why are that I have less work trying to second guess what the players are going to do and lead them back to your path, and I have the opportunity to give the players more reign over their fate. The reason I said this game is not yours is because it becomes the community's through their additions and work. This is why if you railroad, at best you'll have an interactive story. You won't really have a game. 
 
Now this isn't to say that you shouldn't have stone tablets of commandments that the players should adhere to, both in character (background and technical) and out (rules for the game and the board). These tablets should be kept in a safe place, usually a hidden admin forum. You can share some with the players, but don't feel everything in the background must be at their fingertips. In many major universes, info is just a wiki or Google search away. However, if you make your own, then you need to decide what the players know and what they don't. 
 
Also, the reason I say stone tablets is that, should someone do something that goes against them but you like, don't be afraid to toss the tablet off a cliff if you can. If you've shown it to players, it becomes more difficult to change. These aren't the rules set down by the pigs in Animal Farm, that can be rewritten again and again. Once people know of them, it makes for difficult changing. But say you are making a sci-fi game where earth's location is unknown. You should know where it is, even if the players don't. If say a new player puts their planet down where you would place earth, then throw out that stone tablet, unless someone already discovered it. In that case, just make the player pick a new spot (though if you're not careful, they'll just put themselves near it and just look to see what's there).
 
The most important thing to remember is that your players need you, but you also need them. Without them, you're just playing with yourself (which some find fun, but then why are you here?). This means that their opinions are important. But you must weigh them against the health of the game in general, if the most powerful player in game wants to be given something that makes them even more powerful, you must of course first start with "Can they make it happen?" but finish with "Should they make it happen?" Should you let one player get the upper hand? Sure, if they're good. But should you let them take advantage of the other players and ruin their fun? No. The general fun of all players must always be taken into account. Now if you have one decently sane player and a bunch of dolts, the dolts shouldn't just continue being stupid, they should learn through you allowing others advance for doing smart things. 

Einstein would turn over in his grave. Not only does God play dice, the dice are loaded.
~Chairman Sheng-ji Yang, The Human Hive, Alpha Centauri
----------------------------------------------------------------------
It is not the function of our government to keep the citizen from falling into error; it is the function of the citizen to keep the government from falling into error
~US Supreme Court Justice Robert H. Jackson, 1950
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Always remember that the crowd that applauds your coronation is the same crowd that will applaud your beheading. People like a show.
~Going Postal, Sir Terry Pratchett
----------------------------------------------------------------------
America is the only nation in history which miraculously has gone directly from barbarism to degeneration without the usual interval of civilization.
~Georges Clemenceau

#6
Cthulhuvong

Cthulhuvong

    The Tentacle-Faced Mad Man

  • Members
  • 397 posts
Chapter 4: The FUTURE!
 
Now when most people make a game and put it into action, it usually goes like this: "Here's my game, the players will keep it going with their activity, so I don't need to plan ahead!"
 
YOU
 
ARE
 
WRONG
 
 
This leads to games fizzling out after just a few rounds/years. You want yours to last, to be remembered. To do this you need to do 2 things. First, encourage player activity and creativity. The more active and creative they are, the longer your game will last, and the more fulfilling it will be. Second, you must plan. As I've said before, you don't need to railroad the players onto a path. But you must have a beginning, which only some do. It cannot just be "heres the universe, have fun!", it must be something that goes "this is why stuff is getting interesting, so keep it up". There must be a reason things are happening, you shouldn't just cut into the middle of a peaceful time 'because' and then "see what happens". This will doom a game. 
 
Then you must have a middle: "This is why its still interesting and building towards something". In the middle, which can be the bulk of a game, you should have everyone either grow as nations/planets/countries/etc, or 'die off'. Some times these can be peaceful unifications, but also they might be states collapsing or being conquered. Now the events of the middle will eventually build and build until you get to a climax point. And finally it must have an end, a denouement as it were. Some sort of either revelation that changes everything (such as the discovery of a new threat or land), or brings about an end to conflicts (the Peace of Westphalia or Congress of Vienna would be two real life example of a treaty bringing relative peace and stability to Europe), or you can just wipe everyone out through some final dramatic ending, though that does kill thoughts of a sequel. 
 
Sequels should always be a possibility unless your plans demand the end of the game. This way one game can build upon another, and you have a canon building in the background for you. I've run across some games like this and they are beautiful (if a little complex for newcomers to get into). Now some may liken this to a "Soft Restart", but that is a totally different animal. The Soft Restart is just a jump forward. There usually is not any set point where the admins went "we should stop here, have a big event, and blow the players' minds." Instead Soft Restarts go like this: "People are bored and we're losing players; jump ahead a few years!" They rarely last much beyond a few rounds/years. Now this isn't saying you should throw out Soft Restarts. If you feel it will work use it, but its best used where its planned for (5 in game years, then 20 year jump because of X, Y and Z). 

Einstein would turn over in his grave. Not only does God play dice, the dice are loaded.
~Chairman Sheng-ji Yang, The Human Hive, Alpha Centauri
----------------------------------------------------------------------
It is not the function of our government to keep the citizen from falling into error; it is the function of the citizen to keep the government from falling into error
~US Supreme Court Justice Robert H. Jackson, 1950
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Always remember that the crowd that applauds your coronation is the same crowd that will applaud your beheading. People like a show.
~Going Postal, Sir Terry Pratchett
----------------------------------------------------------------------
America is the only nation in history which miraculously has gone directly from barbarism to degeneration without the usual interval of civilization.
~Georges Clemenceau

#7
Cthulhuvong

Cthulhuvong

    The Tentacle-Faced Mad Man

  • Members
  • 397 posts
Chapter 5: Working Your Way from Bottom-Up
 
I'm going to go off on a tangent here, to cover something that hasn't really been covered. Earlier I wrote about "Top-Down" game design. This is where you build the universe and then the systems for it. This is good. The opposite is "Bottom-Up" game design, and for these types of games, its just wrong. When developing a game world, you can do bottom-up, start with the area the players are in and work out from there, adding on things as you go. This is alright. But when you're designing a game, it doesn't work as well. You see, you can't make a system and then build a game around it as well as going the other way around. When you design a game like this, you assume that any process you create will be a fun experience for everyone.
 
The problem lies in the fact that if you focus too much on the system, and not the setting, then players will be playing a system, not a game. Sure your governments model is great, but we've got someone who breaks the mold. Sure you've built an excellent economic system, but players want to deal with politics and most of the system is going to waste. Or worse, its taking away from the fun. Having to manage 3 spreadsheets at a time may be fun for some, but they can go play EVE Online, the rest of us don't quite work that way. What you need to take into account is that players want to play the whole game, not just your system.
 
Now you may say "But my system works for all settings! Its universal!" I would respond with "Yea? Simulate a Technocractic government type with a non-capitalist economy in a Medieval setting, then come talk to me". If you don't know what that is, you've already failed the test. If you say its not possible, you've also failed. If you build from the bottom up, you basically leave yourself open to areas your system doesn't cover, and eventually will have to cover as they will come up. It is better for you to think out the problems in the setting phase, then find the problems, then fix them, then work on the system.
 
Conversely, working bottom up may make you try to cover everything, and covering everything means adding new features to the system. Eventually you add so many that either your players don't know how to use it, or maybe even you don't. And that second one is the worst, because soon you have players who will find what you don't know about your own system (or forgot) and exploit them to game the system and "Win". And that's just bad.
 
Basically, you want to work on the setting before the system, but if you already have your "Ultimate System" in the works, here are some tips. Don't try to cover everything, you'll make a bloated system that won't work and/or be buggy. Do try to make wiggle room that lets you change constants and modifiers. Don't claim its the best. Do try to work out bugs before showing it to your first testers. Hopefully these will help.

Einstein would turn over in his grave. Not only does God play dice, the dice are loaded.
~Chairman Sheng-ji Yang, The Human Hive, Alpha Centauri
----------------------------------------------------------------------
It is not the function of our government to keep the citizen from falling into error; it is the function of the citizen to keep the government from falling into error
~US Supreme Court Justice Robert H. Jackson, 1950
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Always remember that the crowd that applauds your coronation is the same crowd that will applaud your beheading. People like a show.
~Going Postal, Sir Terry Pratchett
----------------------------------------------------------------------
America is the only nation in history which miraculously has gone directly from barbarism to degeneration without the usual interval of civilization.
~Georges Clemenceau

#8
Cthulhuvong

Cthulhuvong

    The Tentacle-Faced Mad Man

  • Members
  • 397 posts
Chapter 6: Players players everywhere, but not a one to kill
 
So I guess I need to write on how to be a player in these games. Players can either be a boon to you or the bane of your existence, so what kind of players you get is important. So here are some general rules to pass on to them.
 
1 - DON'T BE A DOUCHE. Should be simple, right? But alas, it's not. Don't be mean for the sake of it, and try to differentiate between in character and out of character. If you can't do that you shouldn't be playing anyway. This is a community game, and thus everyone is a part of it.
 
2 - Help, and ask for help. Like said before, this is a community game, and if you know something, share it with those that don't. Additionally, if you don't know something, look around and ask for help. Most are willing to give you help, especially if you are willing to help in return.
 
3 - Know the difference between In Character and Out of Character. Touched on before, but needs to be addressed. In Character is in game stuff, Out of Character is the stuff that happens in the real world. A person may be mean in character, but a nice guy out. He may also be the opposite. But if you can't tell the difference it can either upset you or confuse you.
 
4 - no multi's unless admins say its ok. A multi is basically an alternate account beyond your original. Most forums now have ways of tracking ip addresses, so its easy to catch. You don't want to do it because most see it as too easy to cheat, having 2 accounts allows for 1 person to control 2 states. And many games see this as a banning offense. Ask before you do it, and if you and someone else play from the same ip (say a roommate or relative) let the admins know right away. 
 
5 - Know your limitations. If you try stuff you've never tried before that's fine, but don't take on the role of a financial institution if you suck at economics. Know what you can do, and what you can't. I'm not saying don't push your limits, but don't ruin your fun. When you have less fun, you put less effort into something and then that can bring down everyone's fun factor.

Einstein would turn over in his grave. Not only does God play dice, the dice are loaded.
~Chairman Sheng-ji Yang, The Human Hive, Alpha Centauri
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It is not the function of our government to keep the citizen from falling into error; it is the function of the citizen to keep the government from falling into error
~US Supreme Court Justice Robert H. Jackson, 1950
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Always remember that the crowd that applauds your coronation is the same crowd that will applaud your beheading. People like a show.
~Going Postal, Sir Terry Pratchett
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America is the only nation in history which miraculously has gone directly from barbarism to degeneration without the usual interval of civilization.
~Georges Clemenceau




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